Later Adulthood – pies and Human Development




Download 33.86 Kb.
TitleLater Adulthood – pies and Human Development
Date17.05.2013
Size33.86 Kb.
TypePresentations


Later Adulthood – PIES and Human Development

Lesson objective – to learn about the physical, intellectual, emotional and social factors and there effects on adults over the age of 65 years

Physical changes

  • Starter activity - List as many physical changes that you have observed in people over the age of 65 years

  • Information to help you on page 11



AfL

  • Common age-related physical changes include hearing impairment, weakening vision, and the increasing probability of arthritis, hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, and osteoporosis. The speed with which information is encoded, stored, and received may decrease as we age, and older Americans may experience memory loss.



Later adulthood 65+

  • In their sixties and early seventies, many adults lead varied and interesting lives. Lon-distance travel, often to see sibling and other relatives, and new leisure pursuits such as painting and writing are common. The opportunities for older people to meet new friends can be extensive when their health is good and they have sufficient money. There are, however, many older people who find it difficult to make ends meet and tend to withdraw from socialising, due to feelings of shame. In addition, there are those who suffer from ill-health and impairments, which result in their social isolation. A network of family and friends can provide vital and practical support, physically, socially and emotionally.



Emotional positives and negatives

  • Dementia, the irreversible deterioration of intellectual ability accompanied by emotional disturbance, afflicts between 5 and 7 percent of adults over age 65 and 30 percent of those over age 85. Unlike milder forms of mental decline with normal aging, dementia may lead to significant impairment in social functioning. People with dementia often suffer from depression, anxiety, and paranoia.

  • Six percent of older adults suffer from anxiety disorders, and the most common anxiety diagnosis is generalized anxiety disorder, in which a person experiences dread, apprehension, and tension for a period of at least 6 months.

  • The highest suicide rate of any age group is in older adults, primarily older Caucasian men who live alone.

  • The incidence of sexual dysfunction increases with age for both men and women. Sleep problems increase with age, and about one-half of those over age 80 complain of sleep difficulty.

  • Ten to 15 percent of older adults exhibit hypochondriasis, the persistent belief that one has a medical disorder despite the lack of medical findings.

  • Prevalence of alcohol abuse and substance dependence among those age 65 and over is 2 to 5 percent for men and 1 percent for women.

  • Drug abuse among older adults typically takes the form of prescription medication abuse, and older adults take 25 percent of the medication taken in the United States, which underscores that drug abuse among aging adults is often a result of having too many medications prescribed for them.

  • Depression is a negative emotion frequently characterized by sadness, feelings of helplessness, and a sense of loss. Those with depression are likely to have an abrupt onset of symptoms, a history of psychiatric problems, decreased motivation, and a tendency to complain about their memory problems. However, depression among noninstitutionalized older adults is less prevalent than depression in younger adults.

  • Behavior disorders in those over age 65 can take the form of physical aggression, motor overactivity (wandering), and disruptive verbal outbursts. Common causes of behavior disorders include delirium, depression, dementia, and psychosis.

  • Alzheimer's Disease is a progressive disease that leaves a victim unable to form new memories and is marked by the loss of other mental functions. One of the primary symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease is the inability to recall newly learned information, such as a change of address, and disorientation. The onset of Alzheimer's is often gradual, occurring over a period of 8 to 20 years. At first, victims suffer memory loss and often get lost--even in their own homes. Eventually, they may fail to recognize other people, including family; show childish emotions; and lose the ability to dress and clean themselves



In a child's case - a lot of irritating behaviour – sibling rivalry and bickering, for example – is the manifestation of the lack of certain skills: the ability to share, postpone gratification, wait rather than interrupt. “If you work on teaching those skills, you don’t have to put as much emphasis on punishment,”

  • In a child's case - a lot of irritating behaviour – sibling rivalry and bickering, for example – is the manifestation of the lack of certain skills: the ability to share, postpone gratification, wait rather than interrupt. “If you work on teaching those skills, you don’t have to put as much emphasis on punishment,”





Intellectual further development

  • Dementia, the irreversible deterioration of intellectual ability accompanied by emotional disturbance can affect some.

  • Given this, however, the human brain is able to continually adapt and rewire itself. Even in old age, it can grow new neurons. Severe mental decline is usually caused by disease, whereas most age-related losses in memory or motor skills simply result from inactivity and a lack of mental exercise and stimulation. In other words, use it or lose it.

  • In addition, it is a myth: “Many assume that memory abilities will decline in older adulthood to a degree that will significantly affect day-to-day functioning.” Rather, about 85% of adults age 65 and older do not show significant declines in memory ability and are able to live independently.



AfL

  • The speed with which information is encoded, stored, and received may decrease as we age, and older people in the UK may experience memory loss.



Social positive and negative development





Apply some knowledge - Tasks

  • You are asked to read the case studies and plan out a range of activities that will reengage your client.

  • Eco-integrity

  • Social selectivity theory

  • Activity theory

  • Disengagement theory

  • Continuity theory





AfL









Deciding to retire and the reasons why you want to retire







Conclusion to PIES

  • Armed with the facts about the myths and realities surrounding aging, society can better prepare itself to assist its older population, as can individual families. Regular mood and memory checkups should be encouraged for all older adults, just as we now encourage regular physicals. What's important to remember is that depression and social isolation are not normal for older UK residence -living happily and productively is the norm for today's older adults. Continuity theory, continued engagement and activity theory all help us understand more the value and important role that the over 65’s play in our society.



A truly enduring love: Britain's longest-married couple (77 years) tell their enchanting story with photos from their album

  • Last week it was revealed that Ralph and Phyllis Tarrant are the longest-married couple in Britain. In an age where few marriages endure, their 77 years together are inspiring.

  • So what 's their secret for a long-lasting union? Here, LAURA TOPHAM tells the story of Ralph, 107, and Phyllis,101,through their own enchanting words and pictures.

  • 1925 WE'RE JUST GOOD FRIENDS

  • Phyllis was 16 when she met Ralph, a 22-year-old steelworker. For years they were simply friends in a group of youngsters who congregated on a Sheffield street corner each evening to go walking or cycling.

  • 'There was no thought of sex in those days,' says Ralph.

  • Romance developed when they bumped into one another alone one evening. Ralph says: 'We started talking, then realised we'd been walking for hours  -Phyllis had to fly to get home by 10pm.' 

  • Says Dorie: 'Folk don't put up with things these days. The least little problem and they're up and off, aren't they'?

  •  









Welcome to add document to your blog or website

Related:

Later Adulthood – pies and Human Development iconDevelopment is more diverse in late adulthood than at any other age....

Later Adulthood – pies and Human Development icon19 Emerging Adulthood Psychosocial Development Ages 18 25

Later Adulthood – pies and Human Development iconUnderstanding Sexuality Psychosexual Development in young Adulthood

Later Adulthood – pies and Human Development iconFour Stages of Adulthood Ages 19-30 (very young adulthood)

Later Adulthood – pies and Human Development iconEconomic Growth and Human Development

Later Adulthood – pies and Human Development iconA. Nature is more important in human development

Later Adulthood – pies and Human Development iconPpt 3b Culture and human development

Later Adulthood – pies and Human Development iconThe College of Education and Human Development

Later Adulthood – pies and Human Development iconBone Development Human bones grow until about age 25

Later Adulthood – pies and Human Development iconApproaches to International Comparisons of Human Development Beyond gdp

Place this button on your site:
shrdocs.com


The database is protected by copyright © 2013
send message
shrdocs.com
Main page